July 2010 Archives

July 30, 2010

Having a Burn Injury Lawyer

Burn injury is one of the most painful experiences that a person can ever encounter. As some of these injuries result in scarring, it will remind the person of that painful experience for a long time. Some people lose their lives as a result of their injuries while for others; their lives will be changed forever.
Due to the length of the recovery process and rehabilitation, the cost of treatment, the loss of earnings and belongings and the emotional trauma, burn victims have to go through a lot. Some burn injuries are the result of negligence. Negligence is the failure to do something, or doing something in a substandard manner. The basis of a lawsuit may be a landlord's failure to provide tenants with a reasonably safe hot water delivery system, open and accessible egress from an apartment to allow escape during a fire, proper installation of gas burning appliances, as well as many other theories. It's important to consult with a burn injury lawyer as soon as possible. You may be entitled to compensation depending on the cause, severity and the extent of the injury. Hiring an experienced lawyer is important as this lawyer will explain to you your legal options and your rights.
Kramer and Pollack, LLP: (see the link) are VERY well versed in all aspects of representing burn injury victims. They have handled a multitude of burn injury cases ranging from hot water scald burns, to stove tipping cases to explosion cases. They are competent, experienced and very thorough.

July 29, 2010

Home Burn Remedies

First degree burns part I, II are minor burns and can be treated with home remedies. Second degree burns and third degree burns part I, II. need medical attention.

The first step is washing the burned area with cool water. Avoid using ice as it can cause further damage.

Home remedies include:

  • Applying Aloe Vera gel on the burned area. Either from the plant itself or using over the counter products.
  • Applying Vitamin E creams or oils on the burned area.
  • Applying egg white to the burned area.
  • Applying honey to the burned area.
  • Applying St. John's wort oil to the burned area.
  • Applying toothpaste on the burned area.
  • Applying a cut potato slice on the burned area.
  • Applying a cut onion slice on the burned area.
  • Applying mustard on the burned area.
  • Applying yogurt on the burned area.
  • Applying soybean paste on the burned area.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

July 28, 2010

Survivor Story

From burn survivors throughout the world

Survivor X was living happily with his wife and his three boys. On one day in May while he was alone at home, he was trying to clean his yard and garage from the litter that had accumulated during the winter. He lived in a rural area that allowed to incinerators to burn trash. He started a fire with trash from the yard and as he started to clean the garage, he collected boxes and papers and placed them in the fire for destruction, there were several empty oil containers, somehow he picked a full container of injector cleaner and as he placed it in the incinerator it exploded in his face.

He remembers seeing the skin melt from his fingers as he was trying to put down the fire from his face. When the fire was out, he went inside the house and called 911, they arrived after 5-10 minutes. He was taken by an ambulance were he passed out. In August he was brought out of the drug induced coma and he was allowed to go home at the end of September.

He suffered third degree burns over 48% of his body from the waist to his eyebrows. His nose was burned away and one ear was completely gone as well as most of the other. He lost one eye because of scars covering the pupils; his vocal cords and larynx were damaged because of the flame inhalation. He has battled for seven years with polyps in the larynx affecting the amount of air he inhales. He lost all his fingers and thumbs and had the large toe of his right foot removed and placed on his right hand to give him an opposing grip. He has ongoing surgeries for reconstruction and polyps. The surgeries are not as frequent, but at this point he doesn't see an end to the surgeries.

The survivor says "for me the most important asset I have had in recovery was my family. They have been there with help and encouragement and most of all love". He is not the same person now. He learned tolerance, patience and compassion. He also says" the ability to laugh at ones self when things are not going well may mean the difference between being a survivor and being a victim. The road to a happy life is a lot shorter for the survivor than for the victim".

July 26, 2010

Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas. It is quite toxic to humans and other oxygen-breathing organisms. Carbon monoxide poisoning happens when enough carbon monoxide is inhaled. (See carbon monoxide poisoning)

Low levels of carbon monoxide are always present in air. It can also be produced from incomplete combustion of flame fueled devices such as fireplaces, furnaces, stoves, vehicles, space heaters and others.

Breathing carbon monoxide fumes decreases the blood's ability to carry oxygen. Low levels of oxygen can lead to cell death, including cells in vital organs such as the brain and heart.

A carbon monoxide detector is a device with an alarm that is designed to detect elevated levels of carbon monoxide, the detectors can be AC powered, battery operated or hardwired. The AC powered unit may have a battery backup. As the weight of CO is almost identical to the weight of normal air, the detector can be installed near the ceiling or on a wall. The detector shouldn't be placed near a fireplace and shouldn't be installed near a smoke detector so that you are able to distinguish between a CO and a smoke detector alarm when there is an emergency situation.

CO detectors should be present in every home and each level needs a separate detector. If you have one CO detector it should be installed near the sleeping area and make sure that the alarm is loud enough so that you can wake up when it sounds.

When the alarm sounds, don't panic, try to stay calm because the alarm is intended to sounds before you experience symptoms. Evacuate the house, gather all the members of household out to a safe area where there is fresh air. Check if anyone is experiencing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning (see CO poisoning), if yes than call 911. Ventilate the area and identify the source of the carbon monoxide and make sure that your appliances are checked by a professional as soon as possible.

Prevention of CO poisoning:

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector on each floor of your home. Test and replace the detector according to the instructions of the manufacture, check the batteries according to the manufacture instruction.
  • Check the battery once per year.
  • Inspect and properly maintain heating system, chimneys and appliances.
  • Use non electrical space heaters only in well ventilated areas.
  • Don't use a gas oven or stove to heat your house.
  • Don't burn charcoal inside your home, garage, tent or camper.
  • Don't leave cars running inside the garage.
  • If you are using a kerosene heater indoors, make sure there is good ventilation

When buying a CO detector consider the location you want to install the detector in, the power source and the installation ease.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

July 23, 2010

Choose Life

From the book I Will Not Be Broken by Jerry White.

After a major trauma, many think that it's the end of the world, that everything has gone and that there is no point of living anymore. Life will continue. Choosing life means trying to forget about the past and deciding that you will not to be held hostage. Life has many good things to offer and all bad things will be memories. Willing to try, thinking positively and looking always forward toward the future will give you the strength to move forward. Taking small steps at a time are key and results will be amazing. Every survivor can be an inspiration to others of what can be accomplished if you set your mind to it and never give up. Most burn survivors can return to a productive and healthy life.

A woman whose husband was disabled in a civil war, as he was trying to help a fellow friend, although living in extreme poverty, and her husband's difficulty finding work, still she sees that they are living a happy life. She says "I am here living. We are missing a lot of things, yes, but we can live like that.. What belongs to love is love and whatever this poverty in our house, we are living according to our means with our three children here at home".

July 22, 2010

Malignant Melanoma (part II)

Types of malignant melanoma:

  • Superficial spreading melanoma: this type appears as a brown or a black lesion, flat or slightly raised that may show irregular borders and color variegation. It's the most common type of melanoma in whites and most often appears on the upper arm and back in men and on the legs in women. This type spread initially through the epidermis which is the top layer of the skin, it can spread to the other layers of the skin (dermis and subcutaneous tissue) or even other parts of the body if it's not diagnosed and treated early.
  • Nodular melanoma: this type of melanoma spreads quickly therefore it's the most aggressive type; it appears as a rapidly enlarging lump that is usually black in color. It may ulcerate and present as a non healing skin ulcer.
  • Acral lentiginous melanoma: this type usually appears as a black or brown macule that has an irregular border on the palm of the hand, sole of the feet and under the nail. It's the most common among darker skin color people.
  • Mucosal melanoma: this type may appear on the eyelid, lips, esophagus, penis, vulva, and anus.
  • Lentigo maligna melanoma: this type appears on sun damaged skin of the face, neck and scalp as an irregular shaped, pigmented, flat lesion.
Diagnosis:

Diagnosis is made by examining a new appearing lesion or a change in a previously present lesion, when there is a suspicion, a biopsy will be taken and examined under the microscope to confirm the diagnosis. Other diagnostic test maybe needed to diagnose how far the disease has spread such as US, CT scan, MRI and others.

Treatment:

Treatment is usually done by surgically removing the melanoma with removing normal skin surrounding the lesion. Skin graft maybe needed when the lesion is large. In advanced cases lymph nodes maybe removed if melanoma has spread to lymph nodes. Other modalities of treatment maybe used depending on the stage of the disease which includes Chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy. They may be used in combination depending on the stage of the disease.

Regular follow up is important after treatment to make sure that the tumor hasn't returned back as malignant melanoma has a risk of recurrence.

Prevention:

  • Wearing protective clothes help to protect the skin from the effect of sunlight and avoid going out during peak hours from 10am-4pm.
  • Using broad spectrum sunscreens with a sun protection factor of at least 15 or more. Wearing sunscreen 30 minutes before sunlight exposure and on all exposed body areas. Reapply frequently.
  • Tanning beds avoidance.
  • Regularly check your skin for any abnormal skin lesion and any change in previously present lesion, notify your doctor of any skin suspicious lesion.
  • Have your doctor examine your skin regularly.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

July 21, 2010

Malignant Melanoma (part I)

Malignant melanoma is a serious skin cancer affecting the melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells located at the base of the epidermis (see the skin). They are responsible for producing Melanin which is a protein that gives color to the skin, eyes and hair. In the skin melanin pigment acts as an umbrella that absorbs and protects the skin from the effect of ultraviolet radiation. The more melanin produced by melanocyes, the darker the skin.

Malignant melanoma known also as melanoma happens when melanocytes begin to grow in an uncontrollable way. It can happen at all ages but it's more common in young adults and the risk increases with age. Although anyone can be affected, there are certain risk factors that increase the risk of having malignant melanoma and these risk factors include:

  • Fair colored skin.
  • Excessive sunlight exposure.
  • History of sunburn.
  • Previous history of melanoma or other skin cancer squamous or basal cell carcinoma.
  • Family history of melanoma.
  • Presence of large number of moles (more than 50).
  • Presence of abnormal moles (called a typical or dysplastic mole).
  • People with low immune system such as those with Aids or having organ transplantation.
  • People with Xeroderma pigmentosa witch is a genetic disorder.

Signs and symptoms:

Malignant melanoma can appear in normal looking skin or can be appear in a previously present mole or freckle. Warning Changes in a mole or a freckle include:

The ABCDE guide:

  • A for asymmetry in shape where one half is different from the other half.
  • B for border, change in border may include notched or poorly defined border.
  • C for color, uneven distribution of color or more than one color in a lesion is a warning sign.
  • D for diameter, lesions with a diameter greater than 6 millimeter is a warning sign.
  • E for evolving (changing, enlarging).
Other warning changes may include:
  • Itching.
  • Change in consistency eg, become hard.
  • Change in sensation.
  • Bleeding.
  • Oozing.
  • Pigment spread to the surrounding skin.
Malignant melanoma can appear anywhere in the body where melanocytes are present, some appear on sun exposed areas such as the face and hands while others can appear in places such as under the nail (subungual), between the toes, palms and soles, the eye, genitals and mouth. Primary tumors are more common on the back in men and on the lower extremity in women.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

July 20, 2010

Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

Also called Skin cancer-basal cell, Rodent ulcer

It is the most common type of skin cancer. It originates from the basal cells of the epidermis (see the skin). It occurs more often in men than women and used to be more common after the age of 40 but it is more and more being seen in younger people. Ultraviolet light exposure from sun or other source is the main predisposing factor for developing BCC and that is why the majority occur on sun exposed areas such as face, neck and ear but they can also occur in areas which are not exposed to sunlight.

Certain risk factors increase the risk of basal cell carcinoma which may include:

  • People with chronic exposure to sunlight.
  • People with fair skin.
  • People with red, blond or light brown hair.
  • People with blue or green eyes.
  • People with suppressed or low immunity.
  • People who have been exposed to x-ray or other radiation forms for prolonged time.
  • Arsenic exposure.
clinical features:

There is more than one type of BCC and the appearances vary depending on the type of BCC, it may appear as:

  • A bump or a pearly nodule, it may appear as a light pink, brown or flesh colored.
  • An easy bleeding sore or a sore that doesn't heal.
  • A well defined red and scaly patch.
  • A scar like lesion.
Diagnosis:

Diagnosis is made by taking a history, examining the lesion and confirming the diagnosis by taking a skin biopsy. There are many types of biopsies and the patient is given local anesthesia before taking the biopsy to numb the skin.

Treatment:

Treatment depends on the type, extent and the location of BCC. Treatment includes:

  • Surgical excision of the tumor after using local anesthesia followed by closing the wound with stitches.
  • Curettage and electrodessication in which the cancer cells are scrapped away with a curette and the remaining is destroyed with an electrical current that generates heat.
  • Mohs surgery in which the surgeon after removing each piece of skin, examines it under a microscope to check if there is any cancer cells left behind, if tumor cells are still present another piece is removed until the skin sample is free from cancer cells. Among other methods, this method provides the highest cure rate.
  • Cryotherapy: this method freezes the tumor cells using liquid nitrogen leading to their destruction.
  • Radiation therapy: this method may be use when cancer has spread to lymph nodes or other organs or for patients who can't withstand surgery.
  • Topical creams such as imiguimod used for treatment of superficial BCC.

Prevention:

  • Protecting the skin from the effect of sunlight by wearing protective clothes which include hats, clothes with long sleeves and UV protective glasses.
  • Avoid exposure to sunlight in peak hours from 10am-4pm.
  • Sunlight protection by using a broad spectrum sunscreen with a sun protective factor of at least 15 or higher. Apply the sunscreen to all areas of the body 30 minutes before sun exposure. Reapply it frequently.
  • Examining the skin regularly for any lesion that recently appeared, changes in an existing lesion that may be suspicious include: growing, any change in appearance, bleeding, pain, itching, inflammation or a lesion that never heals completely
  • Full skin examination by a qualified physician once a year.
This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.
July 19, 2010

Skin Cancers

The skin like other organs in the body can be affected by cancer. Skin cancer is an abnormal and uncontrolled growth of skin cells that can be divided into three types:

  • Squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Basal cell carcinoma.
  • Malignant melanoma.

Squamous cell carcinoma:

This type of cancer originates from the squamous cells present in the epidermis which is the outer most layer of the skin (see the skin). Too much exposure to ultraviolet light of sun is the most common cause and that's why it is more common on areas that are exposed to sun light.

Certain factors increase the risk of squamous skin cancer which may include:

  • Sunlight exposure for a long time.
  • People with fair skin are more affected than people with dark skin because they have less melanin pigment which protects the skin from sunlight.
  • People who have been exposed to x-rays for a prolonged time.
  • Burns, ulcers and old scars on the skin.
  • Exposure to chemical substances such as arsenic.
  • Old age people.
  • Genetic disorders eg, Xeroderma pigmentosum.
  • People with suppressed or low immunity.
Squamous cell carcinoma can appear on any area of the body but it mostly appear on sun exposed areas such as the head and neck including the ears and lips, back of the hands.

Symptoms and signs:

  • In early stages the skin change may include a skin bump that may be pink or red in color with a rough or scaly surface.
  • A change in a pre existing lesion is a warning sign.
  • Actinic Keratosis is a precancerous skin lesion that may change to squamous cell cancer, changes in Actinic Keratosis may be a warning sign for developing squamous cell carcinoma, and these changes may include: increase in size, increase in redness, bleeding, thickening or pain.
  • This type of cancer has the ability to spread to the deeper layers of the skin and may also spread to other areas of the body as well.
Diagnosis:

Diagnosis is usually made by examining the lesion and confirmed by taking a skin biopsy, there are many types of biopsies and the patient is given local anesthesia before taking the biopsy to numb the skin.

Treatment:

The earlier the diagnosis is, the better is the cure rate. Factors that determine the treatment options are: tumor size, the location of tumor and whether or not the tumor has spread.

  • Cutting the tumor out (excision) after giving local anesthesia and then the wound is closed with stitches.
  • Curettage and electrodessication in which the cancer cells are scrapped away with a curette and the remaining is destroyed with an electrical current that generates heat. This type of treatment is used for small squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Cryotherapy: this method freezes the tumor cells using liquid nitrogen leading to their destruction.
  • Advanced surgery called Mohs surgery in which the surgeon after removing each piece of skin, examines it under a microscope to check if there is any cancer cells left behind, if tumor cells are still present another piece is removed until the skin sample is free from cancer cells. This type of surgery is mostly used for tumors on the face such as the ears or for difficult or recurring tumors.
  • Actinic keratosis and some cases of Bowen's disease which is the earliest form of squamous cell cancer can be treated with 5-fluorouracil containing lotion or imiquimod.
  • Radiotherapy: this method may be used when the tumor is large, in places where it is difficult to remove or to relieve symptoms when the tumor has spread to other parts of the body. Radiotherapy maybe used alone or in combination with surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: this method is used in cases where there is spread of the tumor to other body parts. In advanced cases, chemotherapy is added to surgery or radiation.
  • Photodynamic laser therapy: may be used in Bowen's disease.
Prevention:
  • As sun exposure is the most important factor, protecting the skin by wearing protective clothes which include hats, long sleeve clothes and UV protective glasses and try to stay out of the sun during peak sunny hours from 10am-4pm.
  • Using sunscreens with a sun protective factor (SPF) of at least 15. For children and persons with fair skin use sun protective factor of 30.
  • Regular checking of the skin for any lesion that recently appeared, changes in an existing lesion that may be suspicious include: growing, any change in appearance, bleeding, pain, itching, inflammation or a lesion that never heals completely.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

July 16, 2010

Discharge

Some patients when burned will need to be admitted to the hospital while others don't. When a patient with burns is admitted to the hospital, he/she will be assessed in the burn unit by a team called the burn team. According to the assessment, treatment will be provided to the patient. With time, most patients will improve and at some point a discharge plan will be set for the patient. The patient will be examined by the treating physicians and other members of the burn team before the patient is discharged. In almost all cases, the burn team makes the right decision.

In some cases:

  • If the burn team decided to discharge you from the hospital but you think that you are no ready to be discharged, (either you are not feeling well or for some reason you think that you shouldn't be discharged) and you disagree with the decision to discharge you have to tell the team that there is something wrong with you, and you are not feeling well enough to be discharged. If the team still thinks that you should be discharged you can contact the patient's services representative or anyone who you think can help. Tell them that you disagree with the burn team's decision to discharge.
  • When the burned patient is a pediatric patient, this makes the situation harder as these patients can't speak, communicate, or express their feelings. Parents usually know their children better than anyone else. If your child has been ordered to be discharged but you feel that he/she is not doing well eg, he/she is not playful, not eating well, doesn't hold eye contact, the wounds don't look well or any other reason that leads you to think that your child is not ready to be discharged, you have to tell the doctor in charge or any of the burn team staff that you think your child is not ready to be discharged. If you don't get a satisfactory response you have to seek other channels. Contact the patient's service department and communicate your concerns. Write down the names of the people you speak with and what they say in response to your concerns. You should not be intimidated... Make your feelings known firmly and respectfully.


This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

July 14, 2010

Face Facts

From the book "I Will Not Be Broken" by Jerry White

No matter what trauma you are exposed to, you have to face the fact that it happened, that it is in the past and you can't change it but what can be change is the future.

When the writer was in the hospital after losing his right leg in a landmine explosion, when he had to wheel himself down to the lunch hall during the recovery time, at the beginning he didn't appreciate that he was the one who is doing that. He would think to himself "don't they see the bloody stump?". But he did it and wheeled himself. When he reached the lunch hall he met a lot of people who were exposed to a different kind of trauma. He remembers an old guy who had been in the hospital for months going through rehabilitation having a prosthesis above his knee, telling him "don't worry you'll have your own fake leg one day". These people helped him to get through a very difficult time.

Being in the hospital, Jerry had to face the fact that he lost his leg and he had to deal with it. He started to appreciate his stump. He had six months of rehab to go through. The staff really helped him. If the staff was too sympathetic or pitying, he would probably have sunk into a funk, Jerry says.

People react differently to trauma, some will have intense emotions, some will react with denial, anxiety, frustration, guilt, anger, hopelessness, depression, etc. Dealing with these feelings is the way to get over them and proceed to recovery. Feeling self pity is normal but when it progresses it will lead to negative effects on the survivor. At one point a survivor has to stop feeling self pity and start to move on with life by accepting the facts. For the writer, the key to preventing self pity was outing it. Every survivor has the options and choices to change his/her life to the better by focusing on the things that they have and the things that they can change and do rather than focusing on what they lost or can't change.

July 13, 2010

Reaching Out

From the book I Will Not Be Broken by Jerry White.

Humans are social in nature and can't survive without communication and socializing with others. Some people isolate themselves and retreat into a shell after being exposed to trauma thinking that they are protecting themselves. Reaching out to others and finding people who can understand what you are going through is essential. Surprisingly strangers that we don't know can be of great help and support to us while people we are close to may disappoint us. There will always be people who are willing to help and support us and they are always there when we need them.

The writer benefited a lot from social support while he was in the hospital in Israel after stepping on a landmine. This accident led him to lose one of his legs; he said "with so many people coming and going, it was clear that social support-a primary integrant for overcoming crises-was not missing from my life". Most survivors' testimonies that the writer interviewed were "I would never have made it through without my family. They saved me during the darkest moments. I am closer to my family now, after my accident, than before".

At the time of crises most people need support and it's part of the survival process. Some reach to family and friends while others reach out to god praying and asking him, we need someone, anyone out there to understand what we are going through.

Successful survivors are those who reach out and communicate with family, relatives, friends and support groups in order to get over the loneliness and isolation that accompany the tragedy. It is amazing that many times the inspiration of another survivor, a family member's help, a new relationship or a prayer is all that is needed to make a great change in the survivor's life. You have to be willing to reach out even if you don't want to because the results will be surprising and one day other survivors will reach out to you for help and support.

July 9, 2010

Escaping Victimhood

From the book I Will Not Be Broken by Jerry white.

Some people stay victims which is a type of defense mechanism that follows trauma. Sympathy is welcomed at time of need but some people continue to invite that sympathy because it is comfortable. Every survivor eventually has to take responsibility for his/her life and break this habit of victimhood.

Saying things like "if only I return back to the past to make this right" or "if I didn't drive the car on that time", if only so and so hadn't happen and so on will not change anything and will keep you attached to thoughts that will pull you in the darkness of the past. People who can't let go of their Victimhood will not be able to think positively, take positive actions or relate in a healthy way to others. They will not participate in daily life in an effective way.

You have to make choices to nourish the survivor in you and others. Finding your inner thriver and ignoring your inner victim. By tracing how you think and speak, you can climb out of victimhood. Try to do things that you like such as listening to your favorite songs, donating money to charities, volunteering charity work or other things that work best for you which will help you to find your thrive within you.

July 8, 2010

Survivor Story

From the book I Will Not Be Broken by Jerry white.

A burn survivor who was a passenger in a car when it was rear-ended woke up in the burn unit without knowing that she was burned, she doesn't remember the treatment given to her in the emergency room or at the site of accident. Waking up in the burn center and being told that she was burned gave her the impression that she was burned in a war, she asked "Oh, there was a war". Amputation of part of her right hand is one of the first things she recalls after the passage of two to three weeks of being in the burn center. Her memory of what happened in the first few weeks was vague. On the first day in the burn unit, she remembers that she kept asking for her best friend who came and was beside her although that she couldn't see because her eyes were swollen as a result of the burn. She remembers later on how she was in pain and how it was painful especially after the removal of the bandages. She remembers the nurse feeding her and brushing her teeth as she couldn't do anything with her hands. Morphine injection was given to her by the nurse to be followed within 20 minutes by removing the bandages. Despite Morphine injection, the pain persisted. Taking the bandages off in the morning, putting a sheet around her that could not touch her burned head as it causes pain and then wheeling her to the hydro room, returning to the burn unit and putting the bandages again, all caused her pain that she doesn't want to remember. During her hospitalization, she had visitors that provided her with support during this critical period, as she says "I would have died without them". She firmly believes that she would never have been able to go through this experience without the help and support of her friends and visitors as her family was abroad.

She had to wear a face mask as a result of her facial burns, she wore it and it became routine over time. When the time came to permanently remove the mask, she was afraid that people would see her scars and reject her. With time she was able return back to the community and find positive meaning in her injury that allowed her to continue living and thriving.

July 7, 2010

Burn Camps in Oklahoma

Tulsa Firefighters Educational Clowns Burn Camp:

Oklahoma

This is a 5 day camp for burned children and children who have any disfiguring type of injuries. More than 100 counselors and volunteers participate in this camp ranging from firefighters, burn nurses and many other volunteers. Camp activities include western town theme, go cart track, petting zoo, team building games and much more. Children in this camp have fun, learn and have an experience that they won't forget. Every year there is a different theme and each child will receive many things including a burn camp shirt, hat, camp packet, toys and much more.

For more details see the website.

Email: huffytheclown@cox.net

Phone number: 918- 857-6351/ 918-698-8812 /Cellular: 918- 693-3376

July 6, 2010

Burn Camps in Ohio

ACBC Burn Camp:

Contact person: Mary Mondozzi

The organization: the Paul and Carol David Foundation Burn Institute

Area: Akron Children's hospital, one perkins square

State: Ohio- Akron.

Phone number: 330-543-8813

Fax number: 330-543-9998

Email: mmondozzi@chmca.org

No website available

This camp is during the Summer which is the first full week in August for 6 days.


ACBC Camp Phoenix:

Contact person: Linda Powers

The organization: 3100 East 45th Suite 214

Area: Camp is in cool pines by Prescott, AZ

State: Ohio-Cleveland.

Phone number: 216-883-6633

Fax number: 216-883-6655

Email: lpk39@hotmail.com

There are two camps that are held per year. One is held in the Summer in mid August for 4 days and the other one is held in Winter during the President's day weekend for 4 days.

July 2, 2010

Burn Camps in Georgia

Georgia Firefighters Burn Foundation: Camp Oo-U-La

Georgia

This camp is sponsored entirely by the Georgia Firefighters Burn Foundation and is totally free of charge. It's the first and only camp serving children who survived a burn injury. In this camp survivors will have the opportunity to face social and physical challenges among their peers in a friendly, family type setting. The camp has goals, in this camp an atmosphere of conditionless love and acceptance is provided. Many activities will be provided that give the survivors a sense of accomplishment. Survivors will share their similar experiences and will form a social network that will help building self-esteem. In this camp the child will be seen on the inside not just the scars on the outside. The staff is dedicated to do their best to help and support these children and many of them are burn survivors themselves.

For more details see the website.

Email: campdirector@gfbf.org

Phone number: 404-320-6223

July 1, 2010

Burn Camps in Illinois

Illinois Fire Safety Alliance Burn Camp:

Illinois

This Camp is open to children ages 8-16 that have experienced a burn injury requiring hospitalization in Illinois. A safe environment will be provided for these children were they will enjoy various activities including swimming, row boating, canoeing, fishing, archery, crafts and much more. Survivors will make new friends, built their self-esteem and share their experience with other survivors.

For more details see the website.

Email: ifsa@ifsa.org

Phone number: 847-390-0911