November 2012 Archives

November 29, 2012

Burn Wound healing and Laughter

Laughter is free, it has many positive effects on the physical and mental health and no known negative side effects. Laughter binds people together, infact it's the shortest distance between two people.
A team of researches from the University of Leeds, UK, found laughing habits in people suffering from wounds can accelerate healing compared to using advanced technology.

The effect of laughter may include:

  • Laughter stimulates the release of endorphines, when the endorphins level increase in the brain, the pain perception decreases leding to a decrease in pain.
  • When we laugh, the diaphragm will move leading the blood to move more smoothly throughout the body icreasing the ability of the body to use oxygen and this may lead to faster healing of the wound.
  • Laugh raises the activity and number of natural killer cells (NK cells). NK cells are cells attack and play a major role in rejection of viral infected cells and some types of tumor cells. NK cells are part of the immune system.
  • Helps prevent heart disease ( astudy done in the University of Maryland Medical Center)
  • An increase in Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody which help to fight upper respiratory tract infection. There are five types of Immunoglobulins in our body (IgA, IgG, IgM, IgE, IgD).
  • An increase in immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody, they are the most common type of antibodies in our body and play an important role in fighting viral and bacterial infections, they also cross the placenta (the only Ig that has this ability) and help in protecting the fetus.
  • An increase in immunoglobulin M (IgM) which are the first antibody type produced in response to an infection.
  • An increase in T helper cells, therse are the cells attacked by HIV virus.
  • An increase in gamma interferon which regulates the body's ability to turn on the immune system.
  • An increased in in complement 3 which is part of our immune system that helps antibodies pierce through infected or dysfunctional cells inorder to destroy them.
  • An increase in number and activation of T cells as well as an increase in the ratio of helper/suppressor T cells.
  • An increase in the number of B cells, they are the cells which make all the immunoglobulins.
The effect of laughter on stress:
  • Lowers dopamine level which is associated with elevated blood pressure.
  • Lowers epinephrine.
  • Lowers growth hormone level in the blood.
  • Lowers cortisol level.
  • Lowers other stress hormones.
  • Lowers blood pressure and heart rate after initial short rise.
  • Reduces anxiety and fear.
  • Relaxes our muscles.
  • improves mood.
A stronge immune system is important in burn wound healing. Laughter boosts the immune system and increases the number of immunoglobulins which help fight infections. Infection is the most common complication of burns and is the major cause of death in burn victims. Make use of this easy to use strong medicine as it will not only make you happy, but will make everyone around you happy, it's contagious.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies

See also The effect of stress on the skin, Burn wound care at home.


November 27, 2012

Third Degree Burns and Keloid Scar (Part II)

There is no treatment that can cure and remove keloid scars 100 percent. Patients who have family history of keloid scar or previous history of keloid scar have high possibility of keloid recurrence more then others. Keloid scar may be treated by one or more of the following methods:

Surgery:

It may be the most effective way to remove large keloids. Surgery can be used by itself or with other treatment methods to decrease the possibility of recurrence as there is a possibility of keloid recurrerence an example is using surgery and steriod injection into the keloid scar or using surgery and other treatment methods to decrease recurrence rate.

Laser therapy:
Laser treatment is healpfull when the keloid scar is thin as the laser bean works on the surface of the keloid scar, it's less effective when the keloid scar is thick. Your physician will discuss with you the best method of treatment of your keloid.

Cryosurgery therapy:

Cryosurgery which is freezing of the keloid scar is usually used for small scars only as it causes freezing of the scar and as a result blanching of the skin underneath the scar.

Radiation therapy:

Radiation therapy can be used alone as a treatment method but is more effective within 7 days of after surgical keloid removal.The risk of developing cancer from radiation is small as the radiation device used for this treatment emits smalllow radiation dose.

Creams, Pasts and Gels:

Creams, Gels and Pasts are most effective when the keloid scar is newly formed but still its effectivenes is limited even with newly formed keloid scars.

Silicone sheets:

Silicone sheets can be taped on to the keloid scar. You need to wear the sheets constantly for several weeks or several months.

As keloid scars differ in shape, size and causation from one person to another, the response to treatment also differ among different individuals therefore what might work for one person may not work for you and vise versa.

The combination of two or more treatment methods is usually more effective than using one method by itself and the recurrence is less when combining two or more methods together.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

November 6, 2012

Endotrachial Intubation

It is a medical procedure in which a tube is placed into the trachea to open the airway, remove blockages and to provide oxygen, medication or anesthesia. It may be attached to a machine called a respirator that will breathe for the patient while the tube is still in place. Airway control and mechanical ventilation are often necessary in the treatment of severe burn injuries.

Swelling in the upper airway is a major concern in any person with a burn injury. Swelling may lead to acute respiratory insufficiency, in children the airway is smaller therefore they are more prone to develop airway obstruction from burn. Swelling and damage to the airway may be caused by inhalation of the gases and fumes caused by combustion and/or the effect of heat on the tissue (see smoke inhalation). The extent of the damage to the airways is not directly related to the severity of skin burns and in some cases it may become the greatest therapeutic problem in a gravely burned patient.

Although obstruction of the upper airways caused by edema (swelling of the tissue) may happen acutely, it may not be present until the edema is sufficient enough to produce clinical evidence of impaired airway patency which may take 12-18 hours. Therefore it is important to monitor the patient for any difficulty in respiration even though the patient may not have any problems initially.

Extensive face and neck burns increase the risk of airway compression and the need for early endotracheal intubation. Deep face burns may lead to airway obstruction due to intraoral edema which will in turn decrease the clearance of intraoral secretions and impair the protection of the airway from aspiration. Deep neck burns will increase the risk of airway compression and the need for early endotracheal intubation due to the external compression of the larynx by the swollen neck.

A decision will be made by the treating physician after initial assessment as to whether or not the airway can be managed safely without an endotracheal tube. The treating physician will also make the determination of how long the patient will be intubated and when the tube is taken out depending on the condition of the patient.

When the patient is intubated, he/she may stay in bed for a prolonged period of time, this may increase the risk of developing Deep venous thrombosis (see Deep venous thrombosis part I, II) which is the main cause of pulmonary embolism, these patients are given prophylactic measures to decrease the risk of deep venous thrombosis (medications and compression devices). Make sure that these devices are worn all the time and if they are disconnected (to walk or visit the restroom), make sure that they are reconnected when the patient returns to his/her bed.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.