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October 19, 2010

Burns To The Eyes (Part II)

Flash burns to the eye:

A flash burn to the eye occurs when the person is exposed to a bright ultraviolet light. Causes of flash burn to the eye may include:


  • Welding torch.

  • Direct sunlight.

  • Some types of lamps like halogen lamps.

  • Sunlamp in a tanning salon.

  • Lightning.


Signs and symptoms may include:

  • Usually both eyes are affected.
  • Pain that may be mild to very severe.
  • Sensitivity to light.
  • Redness and watery eye.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Feeling that there may be something in the eyes.
Treatment:


Seek medical advice and follow the physician's orders, place pads over both eyes until medical help is available.

Prevention:

  • Wear sun glasses that protect against ultraviolet light.
  • Wear safety goggles to protect the eye.
  • When welding always wear a welder's mask.
  • In children with burned eyes applying first aid may be harder depending on the age of the child and his/her ability to cooperate. You need to stay calm and may need to have another adult help you with holding the child to facilitate flushing the eyes (if appropriate).
  • It may take up to 24 hours after the burn to determine the seriousness of the eye injury.
  • Some problems such as infection do not show up right away and that is why it is important to follow up with your doctor to make sure that the eyes are healing properly.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

October 18, 2010

Burns To The Eyes (Part I)

Burns to the eyes can be caused by many different things such as chemicals, hot air, steam, sunlight, welding equipments etc.

Chemical burns:

They can be caused by solid chemicals, liquid chemicals, chemical fumes or powdered material. Damage to the eyes may be minimized if they are washed quickly. The most dangerous chemical burns involve strong acids or alkali (base) substances.

Signs and symptoms:

  • Severe pain: because the pain is so severe, the patient tend to keep the eye closed and by keeping it closed this will keep the substance in contact with the eye for a longer period of time which may increase and worsen the damage.
  • Redness and swelling of the eye.
  • Inability or reluctance of opening the eye.
  • Tears from the eye.
  • Scarring and perforation of the eye.
  • Inability to see.
Treatment:

Treatment of chemical burns of the eye should be done immediately even before medical help arrives. Open the eye and flush it with cool water for at least 10 minutes. Quickly flushing and diluting the chemical substance reduces the chance of permanent eye damage. Make sure to avoid contaminating the good eye by avoiding the contaminated water from falling into it. Hold a sterile pad across the eye until you arrive at the hospital where further treatment will be initiated as needed.

Bursts of flames or flash fires from explosives or stoves may cause injury to the eyes and the lids. Hot air or steam can burn the eyes as well as the face. First aid treatment for heat burns to the eyes or the area around the eye involve flushing the eye with cool water and seeking medical attention.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.