Recently in Facial Scars Category

January 19, 2012

Facial Scars

Burn injury may be severe and may involve any part of the body including the face. Facial scars are considered in general as a cosmetic problem, whether or not they are hypertrophic. There are several ways to reduce the appearance of facial scars. Often the scar is simply cut out and closed with tiny stitches, leaving a thinner less noticeable scar.

If the scar lies across the natural skin creases (or lines of relaxation) the surgeon may be able to reposition the scar using Z- Plasty to run parallel to these lines, where it will be less conspicuous.

Some facial scars can be softened using a technique called dermabration, a controlled scraping of the skin using a hand held high speed rotary wheel. Dermabration leaves a smoother surface to the skin but it won't completely erase the scar.

After scar revision:

With any kind of scar revision it's very important to follow your surgeon's instructions to make sure the wound heals properly. Although you may be up and about very quickly, your surgeon will advise you on gradually resuming your normal activities.

As you heal, keep in mind that no scar can be removed completely; the degree of improvement depends on:

  • The size of the scar
  • The direction of the scar
  • The nature and quality of your skin
  • How well you take care of the wound after the operation.
If your scar looks worse at first, don't panic because the final result of your surgery may not be apparent for a year or more.

As there are different methods of facial scar removal and each has its benefits and risks, you will want to schedule an appointment with a practitioner that specializes in facial scar removal before having the procedure completed because they will explain all these risks and benefits. You might also want to do your research on the practitioner that you choose because some are more experienced than others and you will want to choose the one that will provide you with the best results.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.

June 30, 2011

Burn Survivor Camps are the Best Medicine for Children with Severe Burns

A recent article in the Myrtle Beach Sun newspaper discussed a topic that is very helpful to families who have a burn survivor among them.

In Raleigh, NC, yoga instructor Blake Tedder knows how difficult it is for children with burn injuries to face the world. In 2001, Tedder was 17 when he lost 35 percent of his skin in a plane crash.

Tedder was not prepared for the stares and comments after he regained health. Because of his burns, not only did his face stay bright red for a long time, but he also had to wear pantyhose-like garment on his arms. "I felt that I looked like a mummy," said Tedder, now 26 years old. The idea of possibly not being able to play guitar or catch the eye of a girl was devastating, he added.

But at Camp Celebrate, a weekend retreat for children with burn injuries organized by the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center, he started to rebuild his confidence. "It just felt good to be around those who met me before they met my burns," Tedder said.

Tedder returns to the camp this June as a counselor. The camp began when firefighters from around the state met 50 campers at Triangle Town Center and took them to the camp site outside Wake Forest University in a convoy of fire engines.

The children, between ages 7 and 15, spent the weekend fishing, canoeing and swimming with kids who know what they've been through. "Camp Celebrate is a celebration of human spirit and collaboration," said Bruce Cairns, director at the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at UNC Hospitals. The love from the volunteers, firefighters, and staff at the burn center keeps the camp going year after year, Cairns said.

Deb Rosenstein, a therapist at the burn center, started the camp in 1982 because other camps hesitated to accept children who were burn survivors. A year shy of its 30th anniversary, Camp Celebrate has evolved into an after-care program, offering a wide array of services to burn survivors of different ages. Over the years many camp alumni, like Tedder, have returned.

The camp is a rebuilding experience for many of its participants, said Anita Fields, manager at the burn center's after-care program. She remembered one 14-year-old boy who vowed never to wear shorts or swim again. But at the camp he saw children jump into the water, and these children had been through the same trauma and undergone just as many, if not more, surgeries. By the end of the camp the boy wouldn't leave the water, and he even climbed an alpine tower.

As a counselor, Tedder encourages the children to be themselves, despite the scars and disfigurement. Nowadays, he hosts a radio show, plays drums and goes on dates.

It's Jon Hayes' fourth year at Camp Celebrate. The watermelon-eating contest is one of the activities that draw him back. Jon, 10 years old, had second- and third-degree burns on his chest and left arm from when he tried to retrieve a soccer ball from a grill. He said his goal is to be a camp counselor one day.

His parents, Johnny and Debbie of Ocean Isle Beach, stood in the mall parking lot to see Jon climb into a fire engine. They said they know how much he misses seeing his friends at the camp and telling each other ghost stories. "It's the ultimate camp experience," Debbie Hayes said.

The Camp Celebrate experience has given Terrell Watkins a lifelong passion for serving children with special needs. Watkins was 13 when he threw a lit match into a can filled with gasoline, thinking he was building the greatest campfire in the world. The explosion engulfed him and burned 75 percent of his skin.

Watkins survived, but the flames left deep scars all over his face, arms and legs, and destroyed his ear cartilage. The staff at the burn center invited him to the camp, where he met other children who also had scars all over their bodies.

Now 34, Watkins has been a camp counselor since 1996. He played wide receiver for Winston-Salem State University and is now a special education teacher at Cliffdale Elementary School in Fayetteville. Because of his camp experience, he wants to return to school to become a licensed clinical counselor.

"This is what I tell the kids: 'You're going to get looks from people, but you need to be comfortable in your own skin.'" And it doesn't matter whether your skin has scars or not.

March 22, 2011

Survivor Story: Face Transplant Gives Victim of Severe Burns Another Chance


The Associated Press reported today that a Texas construction worker, whose face was completely disfigured by third-degree burns suffered when he fell into an electrical power line, successfully underwent the nation's first full face transplant in a Boston hospital last week.

Dallas Wiens, 25, received a new nose, lips, skin, muscle and nerves from a recently-deceased person. The operation was paid for by the United States armed forces, which is trying to learn more about how to help soldiers who suffer disfiguring facial wounds.

In March 2010, doctors in Spain performed the first full face transplant in the world on a farmer who was accidentally shot in the face, and could not breathe or eat on his own.

Wiens will not resemble what he used to look like, nor will he resemble the unidentified deceased donor. The result will be something in between, said Dr. Bohdan Pomahac, a plastic surgeon who led a team of more than 30 doctors, nurses and other staff at Brigham and Women's Hospital in the 15-hour operation last week. As of today, Wiens was listed in good condition, and has even spoken to family members on the telephone already.

Wiens' face was completely burned away after he came in contact with a power line while painting a church in November 2008. The transplant could not restore his sight, and some nerves were so damaged that he will probably have only partial sensation on the left side of his face and head.

Wiens' grandfather said that "he could have chosen to get bitter, or he could have chosen to get better. His choice was to get better, and thank God that today he is."

In fact, Wiens stayed motivated by the thought of being able to smile again, and to feel kisses on his face from his almost-four-year-old daughter. Wiens added that he also wanted the transplant because it gives hope to extremely disfigured people, rather than having to "look in the mirror and hate what they see," he said. Wiens also hopes to become an advocate for facial donations, and he publicly thanked the donor family for their selflessness

The healing process is not even close to being over, however. Wiens will have to take medication forever to prevent rejection of the tissue that makes up his new face. He did not have insurance when he was injured, but Medicaid paid for the several surgeries before this one. Medicare will cover him from now on, under its disability rules.

To see several videos of Wiens all throughout his ordeal, right up to the present, click here.