Recently in Stop, Drop and Roll Category

September 16, 2011

Fire Safety Education and Fundraising Helps Kids Who Suffered Severe Burns, and Prevents Future Burns

In Mountain View, CA, a year of fund-raising led recently to the moment where a check was presented to the Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation (AARBF), during the annual Peninsula Firefighters Burn Relay.

"This is a major support for us, besides the work of the volunteers and their coming to the Champ Camp," said Sarah Burton, director of programs for the foundation. Champ Camp is one of many residential burn camps nationwide that help kids ages five to 16 who have suffered severe burns. "It goes beyond the monetary donation," she added. "The support of the Mountain View Fire Department through money and time has been phenomenal."

Members of MVFD's Engine 2 and the MV Fire Associates gathered on August 18 to present checks totaling $13,600 to the AARBF. According to a department spokesperson, the funds are raised from the annual MVFD pancake breakfast and through individual donations.

The AARBF provides support to survivors of second degree and third degree burns, as well as their loved ones. The group started after 8-year-old Alisa Ann Ruch died in an accidental fire during a barbecue, 30 years ago. Her parents, local firefighters and medical professionals created AARBF shortly thereafter to prevent severe burn injuries by teaching Stop, Drop and Roll.

All these years later, the program has several events, such as a young adult summit, support services, and Champ Camp.

To support these efforts, each year the MVFD hosts its annual pancake breakfast where they teach fire prevention and also raise money for the foundation. Two of the volunteers with MV Fire Assocates help coordinate on-site rehabilitation services for firefighters who suffered severe burns or smoke inhalation in cases of fires that have at least two alarms. They came with a check for the burn foundation too.

"As part of the fire community, it's our way to show appreciation to the fire departments in the county," said one volunteer. "This is our way to pay back, and also through volunteerism too."

If you or someone you know suffers a burn injury, you should call Kramer & Pollack LLP in Mineola, NY so that they can determine whether another party is legally liable for your injuries and if you have a case.

March 24, 2011

Smoking in Bed: Some People Don't Learn Until They Are Burned


On March 20, the Chicago Sun Times reported that two people were injured when a fire started in an apartment at a Chicago Housing Authority senior citizens building. One person suffered minor smoke inhalation, but an elderly man suffered second- and third-degree burns, all because of a cigarette that touched a mattress and caused it to catch fire.

Firefighters were called at about 1 a.m. to the 14th floor of the building at 1633 W. Madison St. The building is the Patrick Sullivan Apartments, a Chicago Housing Authority senior-living building, according to an address directory. While the first was small and contained only to the bedroom, the smoke was so thick that firefighters evacuated every apartment on the 14th floor.

There are a few lessons to be remembered from this incident. First: Smoking in or near a bed is a terrible idea. If even a small ash lands on a mattress, it can ignite the entire bed in seconds, giving you no time to avoid being burned or having your clothes catch fire. What's more, mattresses generate a lot of smoke quickly, so someone can be overwhelmed in seconds by smoke that's inside a bedroom.

Second: Elderly folks should be checked upon regularly to make sure that they are practicing safe cooking, safe smoking, and taking other precautions whenever it comes to a heat source or an open flame inside their homes. As people get older, their ability to see is diminished, and their memory tends to slip as well . As a result, food sometimes gets burned, boiling water is forgotten about, lit candles are forgotten about, etc.. In other words, the chance for fire or severe burns goes up as people get older, so a watchful eye from a family member, friend, or neighbor would help.

Third: Smoke detectors are absolutely necessary in any home, but when it comes to older folks, that family member, friend or neighbor also needs to make sure that the batteries are still working in each detector.

August 13, 2010

Stop, Drop and Roll

Injuries from fire can be devastating injuries. This method is used to reduce the injuries caused by fire by extinguishing fire on a person's clothes. You should react quickly when your clothes catches fire, there is no time to delay. You should do the following steps:

Stop: avoid running and stand still.

Drop: drop to the ground in a prone position (laying flat), cover your face with your hands to avoid injury to your face.

Roll: roll on the floor to extinguish the fire; don't stop until the fire has been extinguished, this will smoother the flames.

Children should be taught the stop, drop and roll method and this should be practiced with them.

Other techniques can be used with this method like fire extinguisher to boost its effectiveness.

Call 911 as soon as you can for further assistance.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.