Published on:

Burn Severity (Part II)

It is important to determine the severity of the burn as this will determine the type of treatment that is necessary and where the burned patient should receive treatment. Minor burns may be treated at home or in a doctor’s office. These are defined as first- or second-degree burns covering less than 15 percent of an adult’s body or less than 10 percent of a child’s body, or a third-degree burn on less than 2 percent BSA. Moderate burns should be treated at a hospital. These are defined as first- or second-degree burns covering 15 percent to 25 percent of an adult’s body or 10 percent to 20 percent of a child’s body, or a third-degree burn on 2 percent to 10 percent BSA. Critical, or major, burns are the most serious and should be treated in a specialized burn unit. These are defined as first- or second-degree burns covering more than 25 percent of an adult’s body or more than 20 percent of a child’s body, or a third-degree burn on more than 10 percent BSA. In addition, burns involving the hands, feet, face, eyes, ears, or genitals are considered critical.

NOTE: these are only guidelines. Classification of the type and extent of a burn should be done only by medical professionals. It is best to err on the side of caution and seek medical attention. What you may consider minor may in fact be severe.

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice; it should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Call 911 for all medical emergencies.