Articles Posted in Second Degree Burns and Nutritional Support

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Nutritional support is considered as a critical component in the treatment and wound healing of patients suffering from burn injuries (second and third degree burns). The aim of the nutritional support is to provide enough nutrients and supplements either enteral (feeding using the gastrointestinal tract such as oral or feeding tube) and/or parenteral (intravenous infusion) to meet the body demands in response to the metabolic changes that happen in moderate to severe burns. It have been shown that the early introduction of enteral feeding in the burned patients is vital for survival (Rodriguez et al, 2011).

When a burn happens and depending on the severity of the burn, the body react to the injury by increasing the production and secretion of certain hormones which in turn cause an increase in the metabolic demand (hypermetabolic response) that will result in the need of more nutritional support which may sometimes be accompanied by alteration in the carbohydrate, protein and fat breakdown.

The nutritional needs of the patient can be assessed in many ways taking into consideration many factors including the age of the patient, body weight, the percentage of the body surface area burned among other factors. The Curreri formula is used for adults and children. The Harris-Benedict formula is used for adults and the Galvaston formula used for children. Dietitians and treating doctors will assess, monitor, and adjust the nutritional needs frequently as the patient’s condition improves or deteriorates.