Articles Posted in Septic Shock and Third Degree Burns

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One of the complications of severe burn injuries such as third degree burns is septic shock. Septic shock is a serious medical emergency that result from bacteremia ( bacteria in the bloodstream) leading to sepsis which is a systemic immune response to the bacterial toxins, this will lead to a dramatic drop in blood pressure leading to decrease tissue perfusion and decrease oxygen and nutrient supply to the tissues. Septic shock is the number one cause of death in intensive care units and the 13th most common cause of death in U.S (Parrillo, 1990 and US CDC). The mortality rate may reach up to 50%.

Septic shock can cause multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (multiple organ failure) including respiratory system failure and may cause death. Sepsis can be caused by other infectious microorganisms other than bacteria such as fungus and viruses. Septic shock occurs most often in children, elderly and immunocompromised individuals as their immune system is weakened and can’t effectively with infection. Infection can be localized to a particular site but when the immune system is weakened or compromised, the infection can spread to the blood stream causing systemic infection, sepsis and septic shock.

Risk factors for septic shock may include:

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Here is an informative article for anyone who suffers injuries from severe burns–not just soldiers who are burned in combat:

Many American soldiers who suffer burns during combat develop acute kidney injury–an abrupt or rapid decline in kidney function that is potentially deadly. That’s the finding of a study that looked at acute kidney injury among 692 U.S. military casualties who were evacuated from Iraq and Afghanistan to burn units.

Using two different classification systems, the researchers found that rates of acute kidney injury were 24 percent and 30 percent among the casualties. What’s more, those with acute kidney injury were much more likely to die than those without it. Death rates among patients with moderate forms of kidney problems were 21 to 33 percent, while severe forms of the condition were made the death rate a whopping 63 to 65 percent. In comparison, the death rate for patients who did not have acute kidney injury was 0.2 percent.

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According to a recent article in the Bismarck Tribune in North Dakota, a lawsuit seeking compensation for pain, medical expense and loss of income was filed in Northwest District Court in Williston, ND against seven companies on behalf of three men who sustained second degree burns and third degree burns when an oil rig exploded in late July.

The workers, all from North Dakota, were bringing up drilling pipe on a rig for their employer, Cyclone Drilling Inc. when gas escaped the well, causing an explosion and fire. Andrew Rohr, 53, and Timothy Bergee, 53, were hospitalized for well over a month. The lawsuit says Rohr has burns over 60 percent of his body, also suffered septic shock and now has heart problems. Bergee has burns covering 80 percent of his body, and a compromised immune system has caused life-threatening pneumonia, the suit says. The third worker, Jeff Morton, 39, of Stark County, is being treated on an outpatient basis for significant burns to his arms, said their attorney, Robert Hilliard of Texas.

“These men have all been put through hell. Two of our clients have more than half of their bodies covered with burned flesh. The third has had his arms horribly burned,” Hilliard said. “The bottom line is that six different companies failed to protect human lives [in order] to turn a buck.”